Blood tests and Iron deficiency Anemia

What Are Blood Tests?

Blood tests help doctors check for certain diseases and conditions. They also help check the function of your organs and show how well treatments are working.

Specifically, blood tests can help doctors to

  • Evaluate how well organs—such as the kidneys, liver, thyroid, and heart—are working
  • Diagnose diseases and conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, anemia and coronary heart disease
  • Find out whether you have risk factors for heart disease
  • Check whether medicines you’re taking are working
  • Assess how well your blood is clotting

 

7 thoughts on “Blood tests and Iron deficiency Anemia

    • Anemia Treatment

      Treatment for anemia depends on the type, cause, and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes or supplements, medicines, procedures, or surgery to treat blood loss.

      Goals of Treatment

      The goal of treatment is to increase the amount of oxygen that your blood can carry. This is done by raising the red blood cell count and/or hemoglobin level. (Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body.)

      Another goal is to treat the underlying cause of the anemia.

      Dietary Changes and Supplements

      Low levels of vitamins or iron in the body can cause some types of anemia. These low levels might be the result of a poor diet or certain diseases or conditions.

      To raise your vitamin or iron level, your doctor may ask you to change your diet or take vitamin or iron supplements. Common vitamin supplements are vitamin B12 and folic acid (folate). Vitamin C sometimes is given to help the body absorb iron.

      Iron

      Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Your body can more easily absorb iron from meats than from vegetables or other foods. To treat your anemia, your doctor may suggest eating more meat—especially red meat (such as beef or liver), as well as chicken, turkey, pork, fish, and shellfish.

      Nonmeat foods that are good sources of iron include:
      •Spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables
      •Tofu
      •Peas; lentils; white, red, and baked beans; soybeans; and chickpeas
      •Dried fruits, such as prunes, raisins, and apricots
      •Prune juice
      •Iron-fortified cereals and breads

      You can look at the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods to find out how much iron the items contain. The amount is given as a percentage of the total amount of iron you need every day.

      Iron also is available as a supplement. It’s usually combined with multivitamins and other minerals that help your body absorb iron.

      Doctors may recommend iron supplements for premature infants, infants and young children who drink a lot of cow’s milk, and infants who are fed breast milk only or formula that isn’t fortified with iron.

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  1. Very interesting . How do we encourage people that don’t afford especially those not on medical aid as the public hospitals and clinics always overcrowded, unfriendly staff, unprofessional of staff , longer waiting period on the line etc ? I would like to hear more especially for those who can’t afford and still reluctant to take first step.

    Liked by 1 person

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